Museum of Non-Participation
Act 00157
Speech Acts
2011
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  • Conceived across three monitors, these (speech) acts perform utterances from the voice to the body, the body to voice as an exposition of voice, silence, gesture, and authority. Each performer is cast in relation to their own position. They include: Hollywood actor and co-founder of the collective Mosireen a non-profit media centre in Downtown Cairo born out of the explosion of citizen journalism and cultural activism in Egypt during the revolution. Khalid Abdalla stands in downtown Cairo just a few weeks prior to the revolution speaking about the propaganda drive of Western Cinema in their depiction of the Arab body; Act of State an interpretation and translation of the exhibition curated by Ariella Azoulay created from photographs by Palestinians about their struggle which Azoulay argues is a 'citizen contract' in the absence of legitimised legal citizenry, and artist Nabil Ahmed speaking on contemporary labour and migration issues intertwined with his heritage and knowledge of the language movement from Bangladesh and his desire to protest against precarity in the UK. While each work is a speech act that is self-contained, the accumulation of the voices speak to each other and the exhibition as a whole through the spatio-temporal strategies of adjacency and (off)setting of timing. A choreography of images and temporalities collect a collective practice.



  • Hollywood actor and co-founder of the Revolutionary collective Mosireen stands in downtown Cairo just a few weeks prior to the revolution speaking about the propaganda drive of Western Cinema in its depiction of the Arab body



  • Act of State is an interpretation and translation of the exhibition curated by Ariella Azoulay created from photographs by Palestinians about their struggle which Azoulay argues is a 'citizen contract' in the absence of legitimised legal citizenry.



  • Artist Nabil Ahmed speaks on contemporary labour and migration issues intertwined with his heritage and knowledge of the language movement from Bangladesh and his desire to protest against precarity in the UK.